March to Sacramento (last day)

March to Sacramento (last day)

Dolores Huerta speaking to a crowd in front of the State Capitol, Sacramento, 1966. Photo by John Kouns.

On Easter Day, April 10, 1966, the marchers arrived at Sacramento, where 8,000 supporters welcomed the “dignitaries,” the 57 originales—men and women who had made the entire three-week, 280-mile-long pilgrimage from Delano. California Governor Pat Brown refused to meet with the marchers and instead spent the weekend in Palm Springs. “We are no longer interested in listening to the excuses the Governor has given in defense of the growers, to his apologies to them for not paying us decent wages or why the growers cannot dignify the workers as individuals with the right to place the price on their own labor through collective bargaining,” said Dolores Huerta, vice president of the National Farm Workers Association (NFWA) and the principal speaker at the rally, according to the New York Times. By then, the NFWA had signed a recognition agreement with Schenley Industries and was about to start its election campaign for the Di Giorgio elections. After the march of 1966, during the following months and year, the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee (UFWOC) kept securing numerous contracts from local growers, despite facing a strong counterattack from growers in collaboration with the Teamsters.
Bystanders holding the banner of the Cursillos de Cristiandad at the State Capitol, Sacramento, 1966

A group of spectators listens to the speakers at the California State Capitol. A banner of the Cursillos de Cristiandad is in the background. Sacramento, California, April 10, 1966. Photo by John Kouns.

Epifanio Camacho speaking in front of the State Capitol, Sacramento, 1966

Epifanio Camacho, member of the National Farm Workers Association (NFWA) speaks into a microphone in front of the California State Capitol the day the marchers arrived in Sacramento. Camacho is surrounded by many NFWA supporters, some of them holding the union flag. Sacramento, California, April 10, 1966. Photo by John Kouns.

Mike Kratko sitting in front of the State Capitol, Sacramento, 1966

Mike Kratko (left), member of the National Farm Workers Association (NFWA), is sitting on the ground in front of the California State Capitol on the last day of the march. Another union member with a sign in his laps is sitting next to him. The sign reads, “Don’t buy S&W.” Sacramento, California, April 10, 1966. Photo by John Kouns.

Pete Cárdenas, Luis Valenzuela, Roberto Román, and Aristeo Oropeza standing in front of the State Capitol, Sacramento, 1966

Pete Cárdenas (holding the American flag), Luis Valenzuela (with the banner of Our Lady of Guadalupe), Roberto Román (carrying a white wooden cross), and Aristeo Oropeza (with Mexican flag) are standing in front of State Capitol on the last day of the march from Delano. Sacramento, California, April 10, 1966. Photo by John Kouns.

Macario Garcia, Paul Esparza, and Tomas Escalante sitting in front of the State Capitol, Sacramento, 1966

Left to right: Macario García, Paul Esparza, and Tomas Escalante sit on the stage in front of the State Capitol on the last day of the march. All three men were part of the originales, men and women who walked the entire distance from Delano. Sacramento, California, April 10, 1966. Photo by John Kouns.

César Chávez and Hélen Chávez standing in front of the State Capitol, Sacramento, 1966

César Chávez looks smiling at his wife, Helen Chávez, as he introduces her. The California State Capitol is behind them. A lectern filled with microphones is to César’s right. In front at the bottom of the image, a group of journalists records the scene. In the background, a group of marchers applauds and looks at the couple. The symbols of the march and other banners are also in the background. Sacramento, California, April 10, 1966. Photo by John Kouns.

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